The Fortean Forest

Freetown State Forest in Bristol County, MA: apparently it is full of weirdness. It’s in the middle of the Bridgewater Triangle, the Hockamock Swamp abuts it, the Dighton Rock museum is just across I95 on the Taunton River estuary. I’m not especially one for touring the apocryphal weirdness; there’s just so much actual, true weirdness to be had. But with exactly one afternoon available to me amid Thanksgiving to drag a few semi-unwilling members of my family out to some wilderness within range of SW Boston suburbs to celebrate not supporting the capitalist establishment on Black Friday, the Fortean forest was it.

Profile Rock

Profile Rock, Assonet, MA. I’m pretty sure that 1902 postcard on the Wikipedia page is completely wrong.

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Delightful incidental art on Joshua’s Mountain.

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Both of these appear on the same forked beech.

From Profile Rock, looking towards Dighton.

Not pictured: flooded, 350 year old foundations along Payne Rd; ugly, locked concrete building in the shape of a pair of octogonal spectacles which now encloses Dighton Rock; vast fields of solar farms; marina; deer; donkey; Wampanoag ghosts, bigfoot, pterodactyls.

The Poison Mushroom: A Cautionary Tale

After eleven years hunting mushrooms, eight of those since I built up the confidence to actually eat some of what I found, yesterday I had my first bite of poison mushroom. It put me in the emergency room.

I was shown no revelations about how all life on earth is intimately connected in a profound but delicate web (though of course I knew this already). I did not see David Bowie. For four and a half hours I felt completely normal. Then, over three hours, my body voided the entire contents of my digestive system between brief stints of shivering on the bathroom floor. Then I sat in a hospital bed for three hours with a saline drip in my arm while a series of medical professionals asked me, “WHY?”

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In the Deep Snow

In the deep snow, deer can sink in past their bellies. So rather than walking, sometimes it’s easier for them to get around by a series of leaps. After more snow falls and fills in the marks of the deer’s hooves, the tracks of these leaps–impressions of the deer’s body stretching through the woods in a line–look almost exactly like the footprints of an enormous, snow-shoed man running across the frozen landscape with a twelve-foot stride.

Then, in places where the snow hasn’t drifted quite so deep, the deer switch back to walking, and it looks like the enormous, snow-shoed man has shapeshifted into deer form.

Wendigo?

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Mushrooms 2014

It was getting a little echoey in here, so here’s some pictures of wild mushrooms I ate this summer–yes, only the ones I actually ate. Otherwise we’d be here all night.

Chanterelle

July: Chanterelle, Cantharellus cibarius. My reliable, abundant, delicious mainstay. I ate it on pizza, in lasagna, in omelette, and I still have some left in the freezer.

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August: Chicken aka sulphur shelf mushroom, Laetiporus sulphureus. On sandwiches and in stew. Does not really taste like chicken. More like a firm, slightly crumbly mushroom.

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August: Honey mushroom, Armillarea mellea. I ate these raw, actually, which you are strictly not supposed to do. I was fine, but don’t go letting that be a lesson to you.

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September: Painted suillius, Suillius pictus. An old favorite, abundant in season back in Massachusetts, few and far between here in Michigan. This made me happy. I sauteed it with olive oil, balsamic, swiss chard, garlic, jalapeño and the below.

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September: Pear-shaped puffball, Lycoperdon pyriforme. New for me, found on a very old, dead oak positively overrun with fungi. Really tasty sauteed with the above. When very young, as these were, they have a heavenly soft marshmallowy inner texture just like the giant puffball, but with outer skin much less tough.

Maybe I’ll get a few more under my belt if global warming obliges and October remains warm and wet.

Is it time yet?

Is it time?
Okay, yes, this is just me measuring soil temperature to see if it’s time to hunt morels (not yet!) but I think it gets the point across.

Wikipedia says Earth Day is celebrated in 192 countries. Where? By who?

This week’s Cosmos episode was about how we probably would have all died of lead poisoning if somebody hadn’t convinced the corporations…or wait, not convinced…forced the corporations to accept that the absurd lead levels in the atmosphere were their fault and were likely to kill everybody if things went on as they were. Fascinating. It took 20 years between when Clair Patterson pointed this out and when enough people accepted it to actually do something. That happened in 1984, when I was five. This–2014–was the first I’d heard of it.

Why is this not a common cautionary tale, like the bomb?

Seems to me the science about global warming has been in since at least 1991. If we consider Wallace Smith Broecker to be global warming’s Clair Patterson, the science has been in since 1975. When I was negative five. Which would make the year we were supposed to have done something about it 1995.

How long is it going to fucking take?